The End of Retirement, Doctor Burnout and the Female Workforce Takeover

The End of Retirement, Doctor Burnout and the Female Workforce Takeover

The End of Retirement?
ILLUSTRATION: RUTH GWILY
The new second chapter: We hear all the ways millennials and Gen-Zers are changing work life. Barely into their careers, they’re also reshaping how many of us think about retirement, writes WSJ columnist John D. Stoll.Much of it has to do with economic reality. Routinely told they won’t have the cash to retire and can expect to live longer lives than their parents, younger workers are motivated to pursue employment even after they become eligible for Social Security. For many, work has also become their primary source of friendship and intellectual stimulation, addressing a void once filled by children, churches or community organizations.Kevin Frazier, a 26-year-old former legal assistant at Google now studying law and public policy, represents the new view. He expects to dice up his working years into 20-year increments devoted to potentially different areas of interest, with a sabbatical likely in the mix. “I feel zero pressure to retire on time—whatever that even means,” he says.Many WSJ readers who responded to the story agree. At 67, WSJ member Brad Fountain continues to work at an engineering and environmental consulting firm while teaching marketing on the side. He has no plans to stop. For him, “retirement” is more about evolving “to purposeful and challenging life, as opposed to golfing off into the sunset.”– Vanessa Fuhrmans, Deputy Management Bureau Chief, WSJ
Reach me at vanessa.fuhrmans@wsj.com or Twitter: @vjfuhrmans
 
Time Out
Burnout alert: Nearly half of Generation X physicians say they feel burned out, more than older or younger ones, according to a large survey. Roughly 50% of doctors said that they’d be willing to take a big pay cut to ease the stress.
Baby steps for Japanese dads: A potential future prime minister of Japan is setting himself up as a role model by taking paternity leave to help look after his new baby, something relatively few Japanese fathers do.
 
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The Big Number
125The age to which some actuaries are projecting people now entering the workforce could live
 
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Quoteworthy
“I obviously did not do enough homework on the culture decision.”— Sebastian J. Gunningham, one of WeWork’s new co-chief executives, of his move to the office-sharing startup in 2018.
 
Women at Work
The education and health-services sector added 36,000 jobs in December compared with the prior month. PHOTO: ANTONIO PEREZ/ZUMA PRESS
The female labor forceMore than a decade into the U.S. jobs recovery, something big just happened: Women now hold more U.S. payroll jobs than men, and will likely make up an even bigger majority of the workforce in the future.The milestone, made clear in the latest U.S. jobs report, reflects how segregated the workforce remains along gender lines. Women got the lion’s share of new jobs in December because they dominate the services sectors that are growing the most, such as health care and education. Male-dominated fields like manufacturing and mining, on the other hand, lost jobs.Though women briefly surpassed men in the labor force in 2010, just after the financial crisis, expect this shift to be much longer-lasting. “Increasingly, the fortunes of women in the labor market will determine the overall outcomes of the labor market,” says Marianne Wanamaker, a labor economist at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville.
 
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