How to Spin a ‘Mommy Gap’ on Your Resume

Rework Your Resume

The longer you’ve been away from work and your industry, “the bigger the barrier to reentry,” says executive coach Roy Cohen. “That’s why it is crucial to show that you’ve used time off productively by learning new skills, doing freelance or consulting work, or even stretching yourself through community or volunteer roles.”

The best way to highlight this on your resume is by downplaying the rigid old reverse-chronology design. As MONEY explains in “What Your Resume Should Look Like in 2017,” all job seekers today should be more creative in telling their story. One key is to craft a short summary for the top to frame the rest of your resume as you wish to be seen. In your case, highlight your top skills and weave in new experiences you’ve gained in your time away to better sell yourself as a great candidate for the job.

It’s important that you do not apologize for the break, but rather acknowledge it and pivot directly to why you’re best for the role, says Carol Fishman Cohen, co-founder of career reentry firm iRelaunch. “This means you’ll need to practice the interview and have several anecdotes ready from prior jobs or from experiences you had during your time off so that can bring them into the conversation easily.”